Competition Packet

Below is full information about the Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Competition. The Competition Packet includes an overview of the competition sites, key dates, the review process, and resources plus links to register, assemble a team, and submit designs. Download the Competition Packet PDF.

I. Competition Brief

Introduction
Design Competition
Audience
Design Challenge Categories
Design Goals
Review Process
Design Awards Event and Prizes
Competition Calendar
Eligibility
Registration
Submission Requirements
Submission Evaluation Criteria

II. Site Program Information

Industrial: Warehouse Watershed
Commercial: Retail Retrofit
Neighborhood: Greening the Grid

III. Resources

Citywide Policy Documents
Philadelphia Water Department
Environmental Protection Agency
Other Reference Articles and Websites

IV. Terms and Conditions

General
Registration and Submissions
Publicity and Promotion

V. About Us/Contact Us

About the Partners
About the Programs
Contact Us
Sponsors

VI. Competition Forms

Registration Form
Submission Form
Value of Services Form


I. Competition Brief


INTRODUCTION

Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! is a partnership between the Philadelphia Water Department, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Community Design Collaborative created to explore how green stormwater infrastructure can revitalize urban neighborhoods.  The initiative is focused on accelerating the adoption, adaptation and implementation of green stormwater management in the Philadelphia region as a means to innovate toward the next generation of Green Stormwater Infrastructure. A series of design centered programs including exhibitions, workshops, charrettes and design competitions will mobilize public-private partnerships to advance innovative, cost-effective, sustainable site design solutions in Philadelphia that can serve as inspiring, national models for watershed protection and community revitalization.

Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! will promote the principles and methods outlined in Green City, Clean Waters, Philadelphia’s 25-year plan to protect and enhance the city’s waterways by managing stormwater with primarily innovative green stormwater infrastructure, which will also result in the enhancement of communities and the overall urban environment. Philadelphia is a national innovator in stormwater management. With Green City, Clean Waters and other plans and policies like Philadelphia 2035, Greenworks Philadelphia, and Green 2015that have complementary goals, the City is well-positioned to explore the design and aesthetic possibilities of green stormwater infrastructure, improve community wellbeing, change the way we think about rain and its relationship to infrastructure, and provide national models for American cities.

Initiative Objectives

  • Raise awareness about green stormwater infrastructure and the full spectrum of green tools
  • Garner community stewardship and enthusiasm for green stormwater infrastructure
  • Promote innovation and present engaging, cost-effective strategies
  • Catalyze private interest and spur property owners to invest in green stormwater retrofits


DESIGN COMPETITION

As the City of Philadelphia faces the need to manage the quality and volume of combined sewer overflow events, it must make major investments in upgrading its urban stormwater system. As a consequence, property owners face increasing stormwater bills as the city is forced to raise rates to pay for its capital investments. However, the Philadelphia Water Department has a commitment to maintain affordable rates and, therefore, has pledged to research, develop and implement Green Stormwater Infrastructure that maximizes capture and treatment of stormwater at increasingly efficient costs.

Furthermore, commercial property owners are given the option to invest in green stormwater infrastructure and receive a credit on their bills, thus saving money over the long term, while doing what’s right for the environment.  Consequently, property owners need to understand their return on investment for these capital expenses, so they can make an informed decision.

The Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! national design competition seeks to generate innovative, cost-effective designs that can aid public, private and nonprofit property owners in seeing the return on capital investments, illustrate public/private partnership solutions, and serve as prototypes for green stormwater infrastructure throughout Philadelphia and the country.

The competition is composed of three design challenge categories, each of which focuses on a real urban retrofit site within a Philadelphia neighborhood: 1) Industrial: Warehouse Watershed; 2) Neighborhood: Greening the Grid; and 3) Commercial: Retail Retrofit.

The property owners (or representatives) for the three categories have an interest in pursuing the implementation of innovative green stormwater designs that may emerge from this competition. PWD is also committed to helping implement cost-effective designs for these sites.  In order to increase the potential for implementation, the following questions need to be addressed: what is the cost of the initial investment; how long will it take to recover that investment; and what will the cost of maintenance be over the life of the system?

Winning designs will address these questions through the lens of innovative solutions which consider the design of a shared stormwater management system which can, at minimum cost, maximize the collection of stormwater from private and public parcels, as well as the public right of way. Two panels of jurors will choose the winning design in each of the three design challenge categories. Each winning team will receive a cash prize of $10,000.

More in-depth background information regarding the design challenge can be found in the following publications, which are strongly recommended to be read by all competitors: Green City, Clean Waters (CSO Long Term Control Plan Update) Summary Report, Stormwater Crediting: Leveraging private investment to fund urban stormwater retrofits in Philadelphia and beyond, and the SMED Fact Sheet.

Competition Objectives

  • Encourage the greater use of sustainable site design, green stormwater infrastructure, and low impact development
  • Provide design, construction and development professionals in the Philadelphia region with meaningful, hands-on experiences working with green stormwater infrastructure methodologies that can be applied to their everyday practices
  • Demonstrate the benefits (economic, environmental, social) of green stormwater infrastructure to local public officials (policy makers), developers, property owners, design professionals and community leaders
  • Accelerate the process and implementation for three real-life sites which may act as prototypes for similar sites throughout the city
  • Produce design solutions that motivate private property owners to invest in clean water technologies that manage stormwater
  • Recognize innovation and creativity in creating high impact design using green stormwater infrastructure and low impact development


AUDIENCE

Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! competition submissions must be based on technical understanding and should both inspire and inform. The competition is meant to provide innovative, but readily implementable, models of green stormwater infrastructure for cities. Members of the general public, policy makers, owners and developers should be able to view the visualizations and come away with a clear sense of how each team’s solution addresses the design challenge. At the same time, entries must be grounded in real technology and presented with sufficient information to be evaluated by skilled designers, engineers and planners. The winning entries must be compelling and convincing to juries comprised of experts in green stormwater infrastructure, design and development, and public policy.

DESIGN CHALLENGE CATEGORIES

Each design team must choose one of the following categories for which it will submit an entry. Resource information such as maps, site plans, building drawings, neighborhood plans, environmental studies, and other available information will be provided for each category upon registration.

Industrial:  Warehouse Watershed
Hartranft, North Philadelphia


Introducing green stormwater interventions onto a warehouse site for a family-owned metal mesh business and a city-owned vacant lot offers possibilities for public-private partnerships, the revitalization of a high-vacancy residential/industrial neighborhood, and the use of the business’ products in the design.

  • Click here for site program information

Commercial: Retail Retrofit
Grays Ferry, South Philadelphia


Through the design of green stormwater infrastructure, a retail strip center has the potential to play a more central role in the neighborhood through improved walkability, pop-up space for community events, and access to the new recreational trail along the river.

  • Click here for site program information

Neighborhood: Greening the Grid
Queen Village, South Philadelphia


An historic neighborhood with an engaged community and a dense network of streets, alleys, roofs, and open space needs a comprehensive stormwater management strategy that focuses on small-scale, green interventions and considers incentives for residents to invest in green tools.

  • Click here for site program information


DESIGN GOALS

All submissions should strive to meet the following goals:

  • Meet the following criteria:
    • Volume of runoff stored: 0.5” to 3”

Where assumed infiltration is not feasible:

  • Maximum release rates: Release rate when system is at capacity should be 0.05-0.24 cubic feet/second for each acre of directly connected impervious area. (Use a depth of head based on elevation difference between low flow orifice and system bypass/overflow for calculation.)

Where assumed infiltration is feasible:

  • Drain down: 24 – 72 hours (infiltration systems are not limited by the 24 hour minimum limit)
  • Maximize stormwater runoff managed using any of the following stormwater functions:
    • Evapotranspiration
    • Rain water harvesting
    • Infiltration
    • Storage and slow release
  • Maximize directly connected impervious area managed
  • Reduce and disconnect existing impervious areas where possible
  • Minimize any new impervious areas
  • Maximize water pollution removal for total suspended solids, bacteria and nutrients
  • Maximize vegetation and landscape enhancements where feasible
  • Minimize cost per gallon of stormwater runoff managed
  • Meet criteria to lower stormwater fees for property owners
  • Consider cost and complexity of future maintenance
  • Use existing green stormwater infrastructure technologies in innovative and creative ways and/or develop new and creative designs for green stormwater infrastructure
  • Use Sustainable Sites Initiative™ practices as a guide
  • Create designs that are appropriate and fit, aesthetically and programmatically, within an older urban context and, specifically, within the surrounding neighborhood, and have the potential to enhance the public realm
  • Create designs and integrate materials that can be widely adopted and are adaptable to different sites
  • Create benefits and amenities for the community
  • Achieve triple bottom line benefits as outlined in the Green City, Clean Waters plan, such as greenhouse gas reductions, habitat creation, recreation, and reduction of heat island effect
  • Encourage and complement opportunities for public engagement, collaboration, and education about green stormwater management systems
  • Encourage partnership for funding, implementation, and management/maintenance


REVIEW PROCESS

Judging will occur in two phases.  The first round of judging will be conducted by a panel of eight expert jurors, each with experience and expertise in a specific field relevant to the three categories of design challenges. The panel will select up to three finalists in each category based on their scoring of the entries using submission evaluation criteria.

 

The second round of judging will occur at Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Awards where finalists will present their entries to an awards jury and audience. The awards jury will be composed of interested and influential leaders in the Philadelphia area from the design, development, sustainability, civic and government communities. Scores from both rounds will be tabulated and cash prizes will be awarded to one winner in each category at the event.

Expert Jury (invited)

Architecture/Urban Design
Alan Greenberger, FAIA
, Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Director of Commerce City of Philadelphia
Glen Abrams, AICP
, Manager, Strategic Policy and Coordination, Philadelphia Water Department Office of Watersheds

Civil Engineering / Hydrology
Christopher Kloss
, Green Stormwater Infrastructure Coordinator, Office of Water,  US EPA
Rob Traver, PhD, PE, D. WRE
, Professor and Director, Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership

Landscape Architecture
Mark A. Focht, ASLA
, President Elect ASLA/ First Deputy Commissioner, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, City of Philadelphia

Development/Construction
Shanta Schachter
, Deputy Director, New Kensington Community Development Corporation
Patrick McDonald, LEED AP
, Owner, Onion Flats

Sustainability
Mark Alan Hughes, PhD
, Distinguished Senior Fellow, University of Pennsylvania


DESIGN AWARDS EVENT AND PRIZES

Cash prizes in the amount of $10,000 will be presented to three winners – one in each of the three design challenge categories – at the Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Awards, a ticketed program and reception open to the public at the Academy of Natural Sciences on March 7, 2013. The program will feature the finalists’ presentations in Pecha Kucha style, the awards jury review and prize ceremony. The event will bring together competition entrants and other design, development, sustainability and construction professionals, as well as civic and governmental leaders from throughout the area.

The Collaborative will identify the winners of the competition by tabulating results of the first round of judging (80%) and the second round of judging (20%) on-site during a brief intermission.  Awards of the first place prizes in each of the three design challenge categories will be announced immediately following the intermission.  In addition, design boards for all eligible entries, will be on view at the event.  Attendees will have opportunity before and after the event, as well as during the intermission, to view all presentation boards.

First Prize (3 prizes, 1 in each Design Challenge Category)

  • Cash Award of $10,000
  • Profile in Grid Magazine, Summer 2013
  • Team presentation at Academy of Natural Sciences Philadelphia Urban Sustainability Forum, March 21, 2013
  • Board display at Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Exhibition GREENBUILD 2013

Finalists Prizes (Up to 9 total, up to 3 in each Design Challenge Category)

  • Presentation at Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Awards, March 7, 2013
  • Three tickets to Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Awards, March 7, 2013
  • Press coverage by Grid magazineSummer 2013
  • Board display at Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Exhibition GREENBUILD 2013


COMPETITION CALENDAR

October 4, 2012— Registration opens
November 30, 2012— Registration closes at midnight EST
January 22, 2013— Digital submissions are due by 4:00 PM EST
February 1, 2013— Design board submissions are due by 5:00 PM EST
February 7, 2013— Expert jury review
February 14, 2013— Finalists notification
March 7, 2013— Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Awards event


ELIGIBILITY

  • Each submission must come from an integrated design team consisting of a minimum of three licensed professionals, including at least one civil engineer, one architect and one landscape architect.  Entrants are strongly encouraged to include additional team members from the environmental, sustainability, stormwater management, land planning/urban design, development, construction and cost estimating disciplines.  Teams are also encouraged to collaborate with other professionals outside of design fields such as public policy experts, public health experts, educators, economists, business/marketing/finance professionals and urban advocates.
  • While the competition is national, at least one of the required design professionals on each team must be Philadelphia-based.
  • There are no limits on the number of individuals from a single firm that may participate in the competition as members of teams.
  • Individuals may not participate on more than one team competing in the same design challenge category.
  • Entry is prohibited by competition jurors or competition prize sponsors.


REGISTRATION

  • The registration period opens on October 4, 2012, and closes at midnight, EST, November 30, 2012. No registrations shall be accepted after the registration period.
  • A registration fee of $300 (USD) must accompany the completed registration form for each entry. All registration fees are non-refundable and non-transferable.
  • Registration forms shall include all team member information, including names, affiliations, contact information, and electronic signature.
  • Registration forms shall identify one team member as the point of contact to whom all competition-related communications shall be directed.  The point of contact must be one of the required design professionals.
  • Registration forms must indicate the design challenge category that will be the subject of the team’s submission.
  • Registration forms must indicate the person or entity to whom any awarded prize funds should be distributed.
  • Upon acceptance of the registration, an entrant identifying number will be provided to the team via e-mail. This number must be placed on ALL materials submitted, including the first page of the digital submission, and on any and all correspondence.
  • Registration forms shall be completed online.


SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Digital Submission Requirements

  • All digital submissions (except the Submission Form) shall be uploaded through a link provided upon registration and must be received by 4:00 PM, EST, January 22, 2013.
  • To ensure blind judging, submissions must include the entrant identifying number assigned upon registration.  The number is to be placed on ALL materials submitted, including the first page of the digital submission, and on any and all correspondence.
  • The digital submission is composed of the following:
Jury Submission

The expert jury review package (“jury submission”) is to be submitted as a pdf file, consisting of a maximum of 30 pages. Maximum total combined file size shall be 20 MB.  The entrant identifying number should lead the filename (e.g. 1234_submission.pdf). The pdf must not include any identifying features or marks which might reveal the identity of any member of the design team or any organization that may be represented by members of the team.  The jury submission package must contain:

1. Abstract: An abstract statement of no more than 150 words.

2. Narrative: Written overview (“narrative”) of no more than 1500 words that describes the project, summarizes the design team’s concept and articulates the stormwater management strategy. At a minimum, the narrative should address the following:

—Summary of project cost information provided in the cost calculation sheets  provided for each design challenge category

—If infiltration systems are used, define infiltration rate(s) that would make the project feasible

—The directly connected impervious area managed, other impervious areas reduced or disconnected, volume of runoff managed, percentage reduction of stormwater runoff volume, and the hydrologic/drainage analysis used

— Maintainability, marketing, and acceptance by the public of the proposed design

—Identification of funding sources for each component of the proposed design and partnership opportunities including public/private partnerships and interagency partnerships

—Triple bottom line benefits (economic, environmental, social) of the proposed design

—Stormwater fees and maintenance agreements for mixing public and private run-off that could be adopted widely across the city

3. Images: Graphic images of all drawings, which are to include at minimum: site plans, stormwater plans, landscape plans, sections/elevations/perspectives.  Stormwater plans are to include the following information:

—Drainage areas (with identifier and measured area)

—Hydrologic flow direction arrows

—Inlets, other drainage structures (list drainage area)

—Stormwater conveyance, surface and/or subsurface

—Stormwater management practice (SMP) footprint (with measured area)

—Subsurface storage (list storage volume)

—Surface storage, i.e,  bioretention areas, with maximum ponding elevation delineated (list storage volume)

—Overflow connection to public stormwater system if used

—Potential utility conflict areas

4. Cost Calculation Sheets: All completed cost forms provided in the Supporting Documents section of each Design Challenge Site Program

Supplemental Documents

The following items must be submitted at the same time as the jury submission, but separately:

1. Submission Form: A completed submission form, including any changes in team composition from the original registration form and electronic signature must be submitted online.

2. Value of Services: A value of services calculation sheet documenting team hours is to be submitted. THIS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED IN JUDGING.  This form is intended to document the overall value of pro bono service provided through this design competition. The form is to be submitted online: infill.cdesignc.org/participate-2/design-competition/value-of-services/.

3. Press Image: A representative image for press, promotion and online gallery (800 pixels x 600 at 300 dpi.) is to be submitted as a separate jpg file to info@cdesignc.org with “Soak It Up Press Image” and your identifying number in the subject line.

Design Board Submission Requirements

      • One foamcore presentation board (please refer to display board specifications)is to be delivered to the Community Design Collaborative, 1216 Arch Street, First Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107, no later than 5:00 PM EST on February 1, 2013.
      • A digital file of the design board is to be provided as a pdf, jpg, or png file, printable on letter-sized paper at 150 dpi.  Please email the file to info@cdesignc.org with “Soak it Up Competition Board” and your identifying number in the subject line.
      • The board should represent key concepts and elements of the design and include identifying team information. Boards will not be seen by expert jurors. Boards will be displayed at the Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! Design Awards.
      • All finalist boards will become the property of The Community Design Collaborative.
      • Arrangements can be made to pick-up all other boards from the Community Design Collaborative office between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM EST, April 1 through April 5, 2013. If a courier service is picking up your board, we recommend that you advise the service of the nature of the pick-up.
      • The Community Design Collaborative is not responsible for boards that are not claimed by 5:00 PM on April 5, 2013. Boards that are not claimed by the deadline will be discarded.


SUBMISSION EVALUATION CRITERIA

Eligible projects will be evaluated based on the following criteria: 

Stormwater Management

  • Release rates and drain down: the ability for the design to meet criteria as outlined in the Design Goals
  • Stormwater Functions: the use of any combination of evapotranspiration, rain water harvesting, infiltration, and storage and slow release
  • Total volume: the total volume of runoff managed per storm and acres managed, including any street runoff, if applicable, by the proposed infrastructure
  • Stormwater management: the ability to manage stormwater from multiple properties, as well as from the public right of way
  • Water pollutant removal: the ability to provide pollutant removal for total suspended solids, bacteria and nutrients

Cost Effectiveness

    • Cost per gallon: the potential to minimize the cost per gallon of stormwater runoff managed
    • Project costs: consideration of implementation and maintenance costs
    • Stormwater fee savings: the potential for savings in stormwater fees for the property owners

Design and Programming

    • Design innovation: the innovative and creative utilization of existing green stormwater infrastructure technologies and/or development of new and creative designs for green stormwater infrastructure
    • Integrated design: the integration of all project elements including stormwater management
    • Sustainable Sites Initiativepractices: the use of Sustainable Sites Initiative™ practices in the design
    • Adaptability: the use of design and materials that can be widely adopted and are adaptable to different sites
    • Advance Green City, Clean Waters Plan: the ability to offer additional benefits that advance the triple bottom line goals (economic, environmental, social) of the Green City, Clean Waters plan, such as greenhouse gas reductions, habitat creation, recreation, and reduction of heat island effect.
    • Neighborhood context: the appropriateness and potential to fit, aesthetically and programmatically, within an older urban context and, specifically, within the surrounding neighborhood, as well as the potential to enhance the public realm
    • Community benefits and amenities: the potential to create benefits and amenities for the community
    • Public access/visibility: the potential to encourage and complement opportunities for public engagement, collaboration, and education about stormwater management systems

Implementation Strategy

    • Feasibility: the feasibility of all aspects of the construction, implementation and maintenance of the design
    • Partnerships and policy: the potential to: create public/private partnerships for implementation, management and maintenance; identify how stormwater fee savings resulting from multiple property stormwater management systems might be distributed/shared among multiple businesses/property owners; provide recommendations regarding regulatory and administrative changes which would facilitate sharing of mitigation costs and benefits among property owners.
    • Leveraging funding: the potential for the design to attract public and private funding for implementation, management and maintenance

Presentation

    • Submission quality: the provision of detailed and accurate information about project scope, concept design, maps and plans

II. Design Challenge Site Programs

Industrial: Warehouse Watershed


BACKGROUND
Edward Darby & Son, Inc. is a family-owned metal mesh fabricator and distributor with deep roots in the Hartranft neighborhood of North Philadelphia. Established in 1854, the business operates from an agglomeration of buildings that covers 100% of their property – one full city block. The surrounding neighborhood contains a mix of housing and industry, including a large stock of vacant land. The block just to the west of the Darby & Son warehouse is mostly vacant and contains a parcel owned by the City of Philadelphia that could potentially be utilized to manage stormwater from the adjacent warehouse structure.  The warehouse site is also located close to new development within the neighborhood, specifically a new transit-oriented district near Temple University.

This site offers the opportunity to explore the feasibility of managing stormwater entirely on the warehouse site, as well as the potential to incorporate the surrounding streets, sidewalks, and/or city-owned vacant land. How might the solution benefit the property owner through a reduction of stormwater fees, as well as increased energy-efficiency for the warehouse?  Could the solution benefit the surrounding neighborhood by providing a community amenity that might spur and be integrated into the redevelopment of the adjacent land or help to connect these blocks to nearby revitalization efforts?  How might the design for this site leverage private investment and encourage public/private partnerships? How might the use of the metal mesh product, fabricated in the warehouse, be utilized to enhance the design?

SITE ADDRESSES
Edward J. Darby & Son, Inc.

Wire mesh and wire products (family owned – 13 employees)
2200 N. 8th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19133

City-owned vacant lot
2216-40 N. 9th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19133

NEIGHBORHOOD
Hartranft – Bounded by 10th Street to the west, 6th Street to the east, York Street to the north, and Berks Street to the south

SITE OWNER
Dan DiBruno, Sr. (Edward J. Darby & Son, Inc.); City of Philadelphia, Department of Public Property (vacant lot)

COMMUNITY/NONPROFIT PARTNERS
Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha (APM)
, Village of Arts and Humanities, Neighborhood Enrichment Transformation Community Development Corporation (NETCDC), Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS),  Temple University

PUBLIC AGENCY PARTNERS
Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC), Councilman Darrell Clarke’s office, Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities (MOTU), Philadelphia Department of Streets, Philadelphia City Planning Commission (PCPC), Philadelphia Water Department (PWD), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Philadelphia Local Initiative Support Corporation (LISC), US Forest Service, Philadelphia Housing Authority (PHA)

SITE CONDITIONS AND CONTEXT

      • Within combined sewer system area
      • In the Delaware Direct Watershed
      • The warehouse building is 120,000 square feet (sf) and is composed of multiple adjoining structures; it occupies the entire block.
      • Warehouse Site Total Impervious Area = 120,000 sf
      • Although zoned industrial, the site is surrounded by a residential neighborhood
      • Located near a new mixed-use transit-oriented development at 9th and Berks Streets, Paseo Verde and a new affordable housing development, Norris Apartments
      • Located near Temple University Station/Temple University
      • Warehouse owner is interested in solutions to offset future PWD costs. (See Stormwater Management Service Charge Table in Supporting Documents section.)
      • A modified phase 1 study indicates a relative rating of 7 (on a scale of 1-10, with 10 being “high likely), of risk associated with encountering soil and/or groundwater contamination on the city-owned vacant lot during installation of stormwater management technologies. (See full study in the Supporting Documents section for more information.)
      • An initial stormwater management proposal was previously made for the site. (See plan in Supporting Documents section.)

CHALLENGES

      • Limited opportunity for mitigation on warehouse site
      • Internal drainage system within the warehouse (use of PVC piping within a building is not code compliant)
      • Cost effective movement of stormwater from warehouse to adjacent vacant lot site
      • Ownership/maintenance of stormwater infrastructure on public property
      • Any proposed design for the city-owned vacant lot site must consider the potential for future development on adjacent parcels

OPPORTUNITIES

      • Meet other sustainability goals within the warehouse structure
      • Create a community amenity
      • Collect from multiple sites (buildings (commercial and residential)/streets)
      • Establish public/private partnerships
      • Spark adjacent site renovation and development (potential to galvanize development around city-owned land)
      • Create connections to other new development in the neighborhood
      • Integrate green stormwater infrastructure into new development for the entire block
      • Incorporate metal mesh products into the design (see link to Darby & Son website)

DESIGN GOALS

      • Create cost-effective opportunities for mitigation on or off the warehouse site
      • Provide creative solutions for managing stormwater on an existing structure with a complex roofscape
      • Create a stormwater management system large enough to manage runoff from other sites, both public and private (If public, PWD may assist with implementation and management costs.)
      • Create a more sustainable building
      • Ensure a good rate of return on the warehouse owner’s investment
      • Overcome the environmental challenge of managing stormwater in an historically industrial area

DESIGN PARAMETERS

      • The site to be considered for this study is to include the entire warehouse block bounded by Susquehanna and Dauphin, 8th and 9th Streets.  Teams may also choose to include the city-owned lot and the surrounding streets. (PWD can invest in stormwater collection from public Right Of Way (ROW))
      • Design teams may consider the demolition of 20-30% of the warehouse structure. Please note that the offices are currently located in the northwest corner of the property. (See building plans in Supporting Documents section for more information.)
      • The drainage area for stormwater may extend beyond the specific site boundaries, although the footprint of the design must be within the boundaries.

SUBMISSIONS

      • Requirements as indicated in the Competition Packet
      • In addition, the narrative for all submissions should discuss incentives and agreements that could be adopted for managing private run-off in public spaces, as well as managing stormwater from multiple parcels with different owners on one site.

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS AND RESOURCES

Site Specific (a link to access and download the following documents will be provided only to those who register for this design challenge category)

Maps and Aerials

      • Context map
      • Neighborhood aerial photo
      • Land use map

Site Photos

      • Virtual tour

Drawings

      • Site plan
      • Warehouse plans/elevations
      • Previously proposed stormwater management plan

Environmental Studies

      • Modified Phase 1 environmental site assessment for the City-owned property

Cost Calculation Sheets

      • Stormwater management practice summary table
      • Stormwater management service charge and stormwater credit summary table

Neighborhood Studies

      • Stormwater Management Plan for the Village of Arts and Humanities
      • Eastern North Quality of Life Plan

General (refer to Resource section of the Competition Packet)

Commercial: Retail Retrofit


BACKGROUND

Grays Ferry Shopping Center, located in South Philadelphia, is an urban retail strip center which is anchored by a supermarket. It is located on a brownfield site along the Schuylkill River, at the industrial edge of a residential neighborhood. As with most urban strip centers, the majority of the site is impervious surface and is, therefore, a good candidate for exploring the potential for green stormwater interventions which will both reduce stormwater fees for the property and business owners and potentially provide an amenity for the community. Although designed as a vehicular-oriented retail site, the center is just a five-minute walk for thousands of customers and is accessible by public transit for many more. However, the walkability of the site is challenged by the traffic which moves swiftly on Grays Ferry Avenue, pedestrian crossings which are ill-defined, and the center’s large parking lot.
This site offers the opportunity to explore the potential for introducing green stormwater infrastructure on a previously industrial site which is also challenged by underground utilities.  How might the solution benefit the property and business owners through a reduction of stormwater fees, as well as increased energy-efficiency for the buildings?  How can the design benefit the surrounding neighborhood by improving walkability, considering a safe and secure access point to the Schuylkill River Trail extension which will connect the neighborhood to new recreational opportunities and Center City, and by exploring strategies for using the site to host community amenities such as a farmer’s market, a pop-up fair, or garden center?

SITE ADDRESS

Grays Ferry Shopping Center
29th Street and Grays Ferry Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19146

NEIGHBORHOOD

Grays Ferry – Bounded by 25th Street to the east, the Schuylkill River to the west, Morris Street to the south, and Washington Avenue to the north

SITE OWNER

Korman Commercial Properties, Inc.

COMMUNITY NONPROFIT PARTNERS
Grays Ferry Partnership, South of South Neighborhood Association (SOSNA), Schuylkill River Development Corporation (SRDC)

PUBLIC AGENCY PARTNERS
Philadelphia Department of Commerce, Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC), Councilman Kenyatta Johnson’s office, Philadelphia City Planning Commission (PCPC), Philadelphia Water Department (PWD), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

SITE CONDITIONS AND CONTEXT

      • Site area = 426,433 square feet (sf)
      • Total impervious area = 349,332 sf
      • 83,300 sf of retail space and 480 parking spaces
      • Within combined sewer system area
      • Lower Schuylkill River Watershed
      • Adjacent to the Schuylkill River and proposed Schuylkill River Trail
      • Surrounded by residential neighborhoods and industrial sites (waste management and power plant)
      • Owner interested in solutions to offset future PWD costs (See Stormwater Management Service Charge Table in Supporting Documents section.)
      • Zoned industrial and was previously an industrial facility for chemical production

CHALLENGES

      • Brownfield site
      • Built on piles with a passive venting system which creates pockets of vapors (See Supporting Documents section)
      • Major underground utilities on and around the site
      • Not pedestrian friendly
      • Schuylkill River Trail access raises security, liability and safety concerns
      • Building pad site at the southeast end of the existing building is difficult to lease due to its small size

OPPORTUNITIES

      • Create a community amenity including a venue for pop-up weekend events, such as farmers market, night market, retail opportunity for nursery and garden supplies
      • Create more walk-able conditions
      • Connect to the river
      • Collect stormwater runoff from multiple sites (buildings (commercial and residential)/streets)
      • Encourage public/private partnerships
      • Connections/access to the Schuylkill River Trail

DESIGN GOALS

      • Create cost-effective opportunities for mitigation on-site
      • Create a stormwater management system large enough to manage runoff from other sites, both public and private (if public, PWD may assist with implementation and management costs)
      • Create a more sustainable building
      • Ensure a good rate of return on the property owner’s investment
      • Make the center more attractive to both retailers and customers
      • Ensure visibility for retailers (ensure that identifying signage is visible)
      • Overcome the environmental challenge of managing stormwater in an historically industrial area

DESIGN PARAMETERS

      • Must provide a minimum of 440 parking spaces
      • Must enable the property owner to maintain current building and zoning code status
      • In addition to the shopping center property, teams may choose to include the surrounding streets in the site boundary. [PWD can invest in stormwater collection from public Right Of Way (ROW)].
      • The drainage area for stormwater may extend beyond the specific site boundary, although the footprint of the design must be within the boundary.

SUBMISSIONS

      • Requirements as indicated in the Competition Packet

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS AND RESOURCES

Site Specific
(a link to access and download the following documents will be provided only to those who register for this design challenge category)

Maps and Aerials

      • Context map
      • Site aerial photo
      • Land use map

Site Photos

      • Virtual tour

Drawings

      • Site plan
      • Site and building plans/elevations

Environmental Studies

      • 1987 Geotechnical Investigation
      • 1987 Environmental Evaluation
      • Vapors Sampling Plan

Cost Calculation Sheets

      • Stormwater management practice summary table
      • Stormwater management service charge and stormwater credit summary table

Neighborhood Studies

      • Schuylkill Trails Master Plan
      • The Tidal Schuylkill River Master Plan
      • Schuylkill Banks Master Plan and Priority Projects

Leasing Information

      • Leasing flyer

General
(refer to Resource section of the Competition Packet)

Neighborhood: Greening the Grid


BACKGROUND
Queen Village, located in South Philadelphia, is one of Philadelphia’s oldest neighborhoods, dating from the 1700s. After suffering significant post-war decline, Queen Village’s dense fabric of rowhouses, alleyways, and courtyards captivated urban pioneers in the 70s and 80s. Today, the neighborhood is known as a cohesive community with strong leadership and an inclination toward sustainable solutions.  A dense fabric of attached single-family housing is complemented by corner stores, small parks and playgrounds, and former factory and school buildings converted to multi-family housing. Major streets have driving and parking lanes, but there are also plenty of very narrow vehicular and pedestrian residential alleys. Much of the neighborhood represents impervious surface including a sea of roofs, as well as paved rear yards, alleys, and open spaces.

 

This site offers the opportunity to explore how to connect the neighborhood’s network of rooftops, rear yards, alleys, streets, and sidewalks into a comprehensive green rainwater collection system. How might small-scale, green interventions provide a solution, while taking advantage of the neighborhood’s capacity for cooperative efforts toward sustainability? Could a solution for this neighborhood provide a model for a residential incentive program, motivating homeowners to invest in green stormwater infrastructure?

SITE BOUNDARIES

Area bounded by Queen Street to the north, Carpenter Street to the south, 3rd Street to the west and the Front Street to the east

Philadelphia, PA 19147

NEIGHBORHOOD

Queen Village – Bounded by Lombard Street to the north, Washington Avenue to the south, the Delaware River to the east and 6th Street to the west

SITE OWNERS
Public (City)/Private (commercial, institutional, residential, open space)

COMMUNITY/NONPROFIT PARTNERS
Queen Village Neighbors Association (QVNA), South Street Headhouse District, Shot Tower Advisory Council, Center City District (CCD), Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS)

PUBLIC AGENCY PARTNERS
Philadelphia Parks and Recreation (PPR), Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT), Office of Councilman Mark Squilla, Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities (MOTU), Philadelphia Department of Streets, Philadelphia City Planning Commission (PCPC), Philadelphia Water Department (PWD), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Forest Service, Philadelphia Housing Authority (PHA)

SITE CONDITIONS AND CONTEXT

  • Represents a stable, dense residential neighborhood developed on 17th-18th century grid
  • Within combined sewer system area
  • In the Delaware Direct Watershed
  • Adjacent to I-95 and the Delaware River
  • Street network
    • larger public streets with parking (i.e., Queen Street)
    • smaller public streets with no parking – public alleys (i.e., Hancock Street)
    • shared residential rear alleys – orphan alleys (i.e., between Beck and Queen Streets)
    • private alleys – pedestrian only; gated access to residential properties
  • Commercial properties
    • Corner stores
    • Commercial strip center with a parking lot in front
  • Public open space
    • Shot Tower Recreation Center (playground, building, fields, water feature area)
    • pocket park
    • community gardens
    • passive/dog parks
    • traffic triangle

CHALLENGES

      • Collection of stormwater in alleys due to limited access and utilities above and below
      • No current financial incentives for home and small business owners to reduce impervious surface
      • Tight 17th/18th century grid of streets
      • The area is designated an historic district on the national register; it is also designated as a local neighborhood conservation district
      • Shot Tower Recreation Center site: the park is raised from the street; there is limited space in the play area to add greening; the feasibility of a green roof for the building is unknown; maintenance concerns; presence of lead in the ground throughout the site
      • Accommodating multiple new housing developments within the historic grid (both Philadelphia Housing Authority affordable and market rate)

OPPORTUNITIES

      • The community is already active in creating “green” space, both public and private.
      • Develop a prototype for roof collection
      • Consider small, universal  interventions contributing to overall strategy
      • Encourage innovative policy regarding homeowner/small business incentives

DESIGN GOALS

      • Meet overall design goals as indicated in the Competition packet
      • Create a system for collection from private to public, i.e., houses – patios – rear alleys – public alleys – public streets
      • Provide creative solutions for managing public Right Of Way (ROW) runoff and private runoff together in alleys
      • Offer creative solutions for managing public ROW runoff in densely populated areas
      • Create cost effective management of stormwater; maximize the number of green acres (mix of public and private runoff opportunities)
      • Integrate stormwater management into existing green spaces

DESIGN PARAMETERS

      • Assume all buildings have basements.
      • The drainage area for stormwater may extend beyond the specific site boundary, although the footprint of the design must be within the boundary.

SUBMISSIONS

  • Requirements as indicated in the Competition Packet
  • In addition, the narrative for all submissions should discuss:
    • incentives and agreements that could be adopted for managing private run-off in public spaces, as well as managing stormwater from multiple parcels with different owners on one site
    • incentives and agreements that could be adopted by home and small business owners

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS AND RESOURCES

Site specific (a link to access and download the following documents will be provided only to those who register for this design challenge category)

Maps and Aerials

      • Context aerial map
      • Site aerial photo
      • Land use map
      • Street network map

Site Photos

      • Virtual tour

Drawings

      • Site plan

Cost Calculation Sheets

      • Stormwater management practice summary table

Neighborhood Studies

      • QVNA Strategic Planning Committee Report
      • Percy Street

Additional Resources

      • The Chicago Green Alley Handbook

General (refer to Resource section of the Competition Packet)

III. Resources

CITYWIDE POLICY DOCUMENTS

Green City, Clean Waters (2011)
Philadelphia Water Department
Executive Summary
Philadelphia’s visionary 25-year plan to manage combined sewer overflow control and protect the city’s watersheds by managing stormwater runoff with green, decentralized infrastructure. Download the PDF.

Greenworks Philadelphia (2009 Report /2012 Progress Report)
City of Philadelphia Mayor’s Office of Sustainability
Executive Summary
An inter-agency implementation plan that sets fifteen sustainability targets in the areas of energy, environment, equity, economy, and engagement to make Philadelphia the greenest city in America by 2015. 2009 Report: Download the PDF / 2102 Progress Report: Download the PDF.

Green 2015: An Action Plan for the First 500 Acres (2010)
Philadelphia Parks & Recreation
Executive Summary
A comprehensive plan to add 500 acres of green open space in Philadelphia by 2015. View on issuu.

Philadelphia 2035 (2011)
Philadelphia City Planning Commission
Citywide Vision Summary
A project of the Philadelphia City Planning Commission, Philadelphia2035 is a two-phase Comprehensive Plan. The Citywide Vision portion was adopted by the PCPC in June 2011. 18 District Plans—covering every neighborhood of Philadelphia—will be prepared over several years to focus the Citywide Vision’s broad recommendations more specifically and geographically.  Download the PDF.

City of Philadelphia Zoning Code (2012)
Philadelphia City Planning Commission
Philadelphia Zoning Code
The Zoning Code Commission developed a new code that was enacted into law on August 22, 2012. The Zoning Code Quick Reference Guide provides examples for each zoning district, basic measurements and standards, and categories of allowed uses.  Download the PDF.

Complete Streets Design  Handbook (2012)
Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities
Streets Department
This handbook details the preferred street designs and management practices that should provide all travelers with safe and convenient streets. Download the PDF.

 

PHILADELPHIA WATER DEPARTMENT RESOURCES

What We’re Doing
Philadelphia Water Department
An overview with updates on Philadelphia’s efforts to implement Green City, Clean Waters.

Philly Watersheds Blog
Philadelphia Water Department
The latest in watershed news and issues and Philadelphia’s innovative efforts and outreach.

Green City, Clean Waters Videos
Philadelphia Water Department
PWD’s YouTube channel highlights real life examples of green stormwater infrastructure tools/programs for schoolyards, recreation centers, playgrounds and other public spaces.

Stormwater Management Practice Design Guidelines
Philadelphia Water Department
The Philadelphia Stormwater Management Guidance Manual has been created to assist developers in meeting the requirements of the Philadelphia Stormwater Regulations. These tools work together to address stormwater management on the development site from concept to completion. Download the PDF.

Stormwater Parcel Viewer
Philadelphia Water Department
Stormwater billing map viewer provides information on stormwater billing for individual parcels

Stormwater Management Incentives Program (SMIP)
Philadelphia Water Department
Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation
The City of Philadelphia, through the Philadelphia Water Department (PWD) and Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC), have created the Stormwater Management Incentives Program (SMIP) to offer incentives and assistance to non-residential PWD customers. These programs aim to stimulate investment in and utilization of stormwater best management practices, which reduce a parcel’s contribution of stormwater to the City’s sewer and surrounding waterways

  • SMIP Grants provide financial assistant to non-residential property owners who desire to build green stormwater infrastructure to manage private property runoff. SMIP Grant Fact Sheet.
  • SMIP BID Grants will provide financial assistance to Business Improvement Districts, Neighborhood Improvement Districts and Special Services Districts for detailed green stormwater infrastructure feasibility studies to determine if collective stormwater management is physically and economically feasible in a specified geographic area. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis. SMIP BID Grant Fact Sheet.

Stormwater Management Enhancement Districts (SMED)
Stormwater Management Enhancement Districts, or SMEDs are geographic areas with potential for significant concentrated investment in green stormwater infrastructure. A SMED may be identified by several criteria, including focused planning initiatives in an area, substantial stakeholder momentum, concentrated development/redevelopment, hydrologic uniformity, properties impacted by parcel based stormwater charges, favorable partnership opportunities, and high visibility. Once identified, SMEDs may take a variety of forms, including areas with uniform land ownership (i.e. campus scale), areas of common land use such as business or industrial districts, neighborhoods, linear corridors, or some combination.SMED Fact Sheet

Homeowner’s Guide to Stormwater Management
A homeowner’s guide to stormwater managemnt featuring steps and actions individuals for individuals on managing  stormwater in a manner that will restore watershed,  help green the city, and improve quality of life for all residents. Download the PDF.

 

U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RESOURCES

Tapping Green Infrastructure to Curb Sewer Overflows
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
An overview of Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) and why it is a problem for older American cities.

Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Given the multiple benefits associated with green infrastructure, EPA encourages the use of green approaches to stormwater runoff and sewer overflow management to the maximum extent possible. Stormwater experts have developed an extensive knowledge base on the evaluation and implementation of green infrastructure approaches, but current practice lags behind the state of the science. Many tools are available to assist communities in developing green infrastructure strategies that meet community goals as well as Clean Water Act requirements.

Storm Water Management Model with Low Impact Development Controls (SWMM LID)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Storm Water Management Model with Low Impact Development Controls offers hydrologic and hydraulic models that predict the water quantity and quality impacts of green infrastructure scenarios

Water Quality Scorecard
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Tools for identifying the barriers posed by local codes and ordinances.

Stormwater Guidelines for Green, Dense Redevelopment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Design guides for integrating appropriate green infrastructure controls into site designs.

The Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Partnership (G3)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
The Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Partnership (G3) aims to stimulate the green jobs market and enable families to work where they live and play. Small to mid-sized communities can boost their local economies and protect water resources through the use of watershed planning, design and construction of stormwater best management practices. Visit the G3 Academy, a virtual resource and collaborative network.

Alternative Financing Models For Accomplishing Green Urban Stormwater Retrofits
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
The Alternative Financing Models webcast provides information to help encourage and incentivize private investment in urban retrofit construction and long term maintenance.

OTHER RESOURCES/ARTICLES

Stormwater Crediting: Leveraging private investment to fund urban stormwater retrofits in Philadelphia and beyond  (2011)
stormH20.com
Excellent stormH20.com editorial by Shandor Szalay about leveraging private investment in urban stormwater retrofits through the City of Philadelphia through an incentive program and public-private partnerships.

The Value of Green Infrastructure
American Rivers
Methodologies for quantifying the range of benefits associated with green infrastructure approaches. Download the PDF.

Banking on Green: A Look at How Green Infrastructure Can Save Municipalities Money and Provide Economic Benefits Communitywide (April 2012)
American Rivers
American Society of Landscape Architects
Water Environment Federation
A new report looks at the most cost-effective options for managing polluted runoff and protecting clean water, and finds that green infrastructure solutions save taxpayer money and provide community benefits by managing stormwater where it falls. Download the PDF.

Financing Stormwater Retrofits in Philadelphia and Beyond (February 2012)
Natural Resources Defense Council
A joint product of NRDC’s Water Program and Center for Market Innovation this report  uses Philadelphia as a test case to explore how cities can attract billions of dollars in private investment in stormwater retrofits, saving on public infrastructure costs while cleaning waterways and greening communities. Download the PDF.

Rooftops to Rivers II:  Green Strategies for Controlling Stormwater and Combined Sewer Overflows
Natural Resources Defense Council
Philadelphia Case Study
Each of the cities profiled in Rooftops to Rivers II is a leader in green infrastructure investment—rethinking the design of municipal services and infrastructure. These cities leverage funding in creative ways. They provide tools to residential and commercial land owners to retrofit private properties and realize the multiple benefits provided by green infrastructure. Download the PDF.

Green Roofs
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS)
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society has created an online guide that is useful in finding information about green roofs and how to create them.  It includes a compilation of books, websites, and articles.

Neighborhood Gardens Association
Pennsylvania Horticultural  Society
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS) has recently assumed management and operations of the Neighborhood Gardens Association: A Philadelphia Land Trust (NGA). NGA manages a portfolio of 25-30 community gardens around the City of Philadelphia and works to ensure the continuity and long-term preservation of community-managed gardens and green spaces in Philadelphia neighborhoods, which are critical elements of stormwater management.

The Price of Greening Stormwater
Governing Magazine, Tom Arrandale, 4/20/2012

Philadelphia Cleans Up Storm Water with Innovative Program
National Geographic Daily News, Paul McRandle, 6/6/2012

Philadelphia Embarks on Green Stormwater Management
Philadelphia Inquirer, Sandy Bauers, 4/11/2012

IV. Terms and Conditions

General

The Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up national design competition is organized and administered by the Community Design Collaborative (the Collaborative) in partnership with the Philadelphia Water Department  (PWD) and the US Environmental Protection Agency Region 3 (EPA) – (the Partners).

  • The decisions and opinions of the judges represent their professional viewpoints, not the opinions of The Partners.
  • All prizes will be awarded at the discretion of The Partners and all decisions are final.
  • This competition is purely conceptual, and the selection of finalists or prize winners in no way indicates intent of the property owners or the Partners to implement the proposed schemes.
  • By entering, the competition entrants agree in full to these Terms.

Registration and Submissions

  • The Partners reserve their right to refuse any entry.
  • All Submissions shall be vetted for eligibility and strict adherence with all Competition Rules and Criteria as defined herein or in any competition brief (or similar).
  • The Partners assume no responsibility for postal, technical or natural conditions that prevent the receipt or judging of a competition submission, or any part thereof.
  • Through participation in the Competition, entrant agrees to release, indemnify, defend, and hold harmless any party from any liability, any claim for damages, and/or suit for or by reason of said submission.
  • All images must either be created by the team or sufficiently cited.  Failure to do so will result in disqualification.
  • Upon registering for this competition, all competitors agree to waive any and all claims against the Partners as a result of the competition.

Publicity and Promotion

  • By registering, the entrants transfer unlimited use for publication, exhibition and electronic posting of all entries to The Partners.
  • Any entrant may be asked to take part in publicity and promotional activities for the competition.
  • By entering the competition, the entrant acknowledges and accepts that all aspects of any submission may be used for publicity purposes.
  • The entrant may be invited to personally partake in publicity opportunities such as interviews put forward to the entrant by the Collaborative.
  • Each opportunity will be taken on merit and the entrant will have the right to decline any opportunity.
  • All winning boards become the property of the Partners.

V. About Us/Contact Us

ABOUT THE PARTNERS

Philadelphia Water Department serves the Greater Philadelphia region by providing integrated water, wastewater, and stormwater services. One of the utility’s primary missions is to sustain and enhance the region’s watersheds and quality of life by managing wastewater and stormwater effectively.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protects human health and the environment. To achieve its mission, the agency develops and enforces regulations, gives grants, studies environmental issues, sponsors partnerships, reaches people about the environment, and publishes information.

Community Design Collaborative is a community design center that provides pro bono preliminary design services to nonprofit organizations, offers unique volunteer opportunities for design professionals, and raises awareness about the importance of design in community revitalization.  cdesignc.org

ABOUT SITE ADVISORS

The Partners would like to thank and acknowledge all property owners, community based-organizations, development nonprofits and public agencies who shared their time and energy to develop and review programs for each site.

Industrial: Warehouse Watershed

Asociación Puertorriqueños en Marcha

Edward J. Darby & Son, Inc.

City of Philadelphia, Department of Public Property

Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities

Neighborhood Enrichment Transformation Community Development Corporation

Office of Councilman Darrell Clarke

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society

Philadelphia City Planning Commission

Philadelphia Department of Streets

Philadelphia Housing Authority

Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation

Philadelphia Local Initiative Support Corporation

Temple University

US Forest Service

Village of Arts and Humanities

Commercial: Retail Retrofit

Grays Ferry Partnership

Korman Properties

Office of Councilman Kenyatta Johnson

Philadelphia City Planning Commission

Philadelphia Department of Commerce

Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation

Schuylkill River Development Corporation

South of South Neighborhood Association

Neighborhood: Greening the Grid

Center City District

Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities

Office of Councilman Mark Squilla

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation

Pennsylvania Horticultural Society

Philadelphia City Planning Commission

Philadelphia Department of Streets

Philadelphia Housing Authority

Philadelphia Parks and Recreation

Queen Village Neighbors Association

Shot Tower Advisory Council

South Street Headhouse District

US Forest Service

ABOUT THE PROGRAMS

Infill Philadelphia was created by the Community Design Collaborative to help urban communities re-envision their neighborhoods, leverage their assets, and address the practical concerns of specific sites and the surrounding community. The initiative uses interactive, design-centered programs and events to bring together design practitioners, community development experts, policymakers, funders, and the media to collaborate on urban infill development—a key revitalization strategy in Philadelphia and other older American cities.

SOAK IT UP, PHILLY! is an outreach campaign of the Philadelphia Water Department (PWD) to celebrate Green City, Clean Waters, the City’s innovative and environmentally-sustainable approach to improving the health of our local waterways primarily through green stormwater management. By soaking up rainwater where it lands, keeping it out of sewer pipes and ensuring that our rivers and streams are clean and safe, we can transform our neighborhoods and City into a place where all want to live, work and play. SOAK IT UP, PHILLY! builds awareness about PWD’s green approach and engages citizens in the use of green tools on their properties and in their communities to help improve our waterways and urban landscape.

COMPETITION INQUIRIES

General and Registration Inquiries competition@infillphiladelphia.org

Media Inquiries linda@cdesignc.org

Sponsorship Inquiries chris@cdesignc.org

CONNECT

Email competition@infillphiladelphia.org

Website infill.cdesignc.org

Twitter Follow us @infillphilly  Tweet about us  #infillsoakitup

Facebook Like us

GOOGLE GROUPS FORUM

Design Competition Teams can make inquiries and keep up to date through moderated discussions on our Google Groups page:

  • Team Finder (Post here if you’re interested in joining a team)
  • Teammate Finder (Post here if you’re looking for a teammate)
  • Questions & Answers (Post here if you have questions about the competition or terms and conditions.  Responses will be provided within 5 days.

Request to be added by going to the Infill Philadelphia: Soak It Up! group page.

VI.  Competition Forms

Registration and submission have closed.